Amazing Spider-Man, The: The Untold Extended Edition

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In my honest opinion, absolutely the best way to watch this movie

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NOTE: This review will cover both Masirimso’s original “Extended Edition” as well as the updated “Untold Extended Edition.” Since the latter is identical to the original, apart from the addition of the Roosevelt subplot, I will be putting this identical review on both cuts (so that everyone is on the same page).

Let’s get this right out of the way; Masirimo has turned this from what felt like a blatant cash-grab, by Sony, into an actual film. Obviously Marc Webb’s intentions were far beyond Sony’s, since they made this film solely to retain the rights to Spider-Man — per their contract of making a film ever few years — unlike the film’s director, who was attempting to convey a well developed series of character-arcs; connected by a theme of fatherhood and loss across all of them.

The deleted scenes should never have been cut; that goes without saying. Without having Doctor Connor’s scene with his son, we lose an integral thematic mirror to Peter losing his father. In fact, by also placing the scenes back in their correct screenplay order — as opposed to the sloppily re-arranged order they’re presented in the theatrical cut — I now actually understand what the theme of this film is: The death of father figures, and how they live on in the legacy of their actions. Peter, Connor, and Gwen all serve a mirroring role in three similar character-arcs, where each is either a child losing a father or a father losing their child. All of them live on as the legacy of their lost father figure.

There are still things that feel blatantly ripped from the Raimi films; the downgraded “web font” opening titles, the promise to stay away from the love of his life, and I’m scared that whatever Masirimo does with “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” won’t be able to save it feeling like a blatant retread of Raimi’s “Spider-Man 2” in that regard; but I’ll wait and see, giving him the benefit of the doubt. Needless to say, these moments felt less obnoxious in this cut. Where the recycled content outnumbered the original additions, now it is quite the reverse. I’m happy to say that Masirimo has successfully turned a recycled cash-grab into a unique addition to the Spider-Man mythos.

Now let’s talk about the element unique to the updated “Untold Extended Edition;” the inclusion of the Roosevelt subplot. To be honest, as well as it works here — even going as far as bookending the opening scene — it still feels out of place, despite Masirimo integrating it in a way that feels (mostly) thematically relevant, as opposed to being meaningless filler. I’ve seen other reviewers say they couldn’t explain it, but that they could “tell” which scenes were from “Amazing Spider-Man 2.” The reason is simple: the visual continuity in these scenes, of both Peter and Aunt-May’s hair, blatantly doesn’t match the visual continuity of their hair in the first film. The differences are distractingly obvious, and it pulls me out of the film when these scenes show up.

That’s a minor issue, though. Let’s talk about the bigger problem, for both films, introduced by moving this subplot here. There are places where the scene transitions feel awkward. For example: originally Connor deciding to kill Peter flowed naturally into the following scene at the school, where he attempts to do just that. But in the updated “Untold Extended Edition,” Connor’s deciding to kill Peter now awkwardly cuts away to some random scene from the Roosevelt subplot, THEN awkwardly transitions from that to the school. So it actually hurts the flow of the narrative to insert this subplot into the places it goes, because it’s usually not relevant to what’s happening at that point in the film. And while it’s great to have the full-circle resolution to the opening prologue, it serves the film’s bookends at the expense of its body/middle.

Even with this resolution, it also creates a problem of their being two different “father-figures” for Peter in the same film; being both his literal father and Uncle Ben. The resolution of the train scene is immediately followed by the phone call, so either one resolves the film’s thematic-arc about lost father figures. You don’t need both, because the other just re-iterates an idea that’s been established already. It honestly kind of makes Ben’s father-model role in the film less meaningful, especially when it’s in the context of filling the void left by Peter’s literal father. If his literal father “returns” in a sense, by means of a video message, it makes Ben filling that void less impactful. Once you factor in Ben literally saying Peter has “unresolved” conflicts to deal with, in the film’s conclusion, it even further hurts his role in the film; because he’s wrong. Peter’s conflicts ARE resolved now. It almost negates the whole point of even including Ben’s final voice message.

This is just the ways the inclusion of the Roosevelt subplot hurts the first “Amazing Spider-Man.” Now let’s talk about the very subtle way it (probably) hurts its sequel. The plane crash needed to be at the start of “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” for a very important reason: it provides a thematic mirror to Gwen’s death. Richard Parker loses the love of his life, as a consequence of his devotion to do good. Likewise, his son Peter Parker loses the love of his life, as a consequence of HIS devotion to do good. Considering Masirimo more than likely put back the deleted scene where Richard Parker returns alive, it also serves as an integral bookend to that scene. Peter’s dad returning comes full-circle with the opening prologue, of the plane crash, because it happens after Gwen’s death; his return is a comfort to Peter in that moment, because he can personally relate to what Peter’s going through in having also lost the love of his life. So I don’t actually have to watch Masirimo’s cut of “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” to know removing the plane crash prologue hurts that film’s thematic bookends.

That being said, this review is not about “The Amazing Spider-Man 2;” and considering I haven’t actually watched Masirimo’s “Untold Finale Edition” of it yet, it’s unfair to be too critical until then. But I do already anticipate that cut of ASM 2 will be losing an integral thematic framework, without the plane sequence, because it was moved to this film.

Back to talking about “The Amazing Spider-Man.” If Masirimo’s bang up job on this film is any indication, I can afford to give him the benefit of the doubt on the next one. He turned a film without merit, or unique accomplishment, into something that stands apart from prior adaptions of Spider-Man. I still think the inclusion of the Roosevelt subplot harms the film, which is why I suggest anyone reading this go with his original “Extended Edition.”
NOT the “Untold Extended Edition.”

…I will say I fear how this recommendation will impact the sequel. Just based on the descriptions of the changes in both versions, I know his original “Ultimate Edition” of ASM 2 is radically different than his updated “Untold Finale Edition” of AMS 2; as opposed to his two versions of this film, which are virtually identical apart from the inclusion/exclusion of the Roosevelt subplot. Based solely on the descriptions of the two cuts, I wish there was a perfect cut of ASM 2 that was essentially the same as the “Untold Finale Edition,” but with the plane-crash prologue left intact. I strongly fear the film will lack its thematic setup without that scene.

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Owner's reply January 16, 2022

I'm glad you liked my edit, and I'm sorry you didn't agree with all my choices. First I should say that I don't disagree with you when you say that the placement of his talk with Aunt May was awkward... I feel the same way. Unfortunately there was nothing I could do about that because Peter's goals keep changing throughout the film--it would have been more awkward to place it anywhere else.

Before the basketball scene, Oscorp, and then Ben's death, I was able to add Peter researching about Roosevelt further as it fit well with his goals in that scene. Later however, all he cares about is catching Ben's death, and after the bridge scene his focus immediately shifts to finding out about the Lizard, which leads to his discovery, pursuit, injury, and then the high school fight, etc. etc. I think sandwiching his talk between the bridge scene and his talk with Gwen at school would have been even worse, because his attitude wouldn't fit after learning the earth-shattering information about his parents.

My defense to placing that scene before the high school fight though is that the Lizard doesn't actually *decide* to kill Peter in the deleted scene I replaced with the theatrical sewers scene--he only reaffirms his evolutionary superiority. There's no decision. So I felt it was okay to add the TASM2 scene without compromising the body *as much*--plus it's more of a surprise when Lizard attacks the school. That being said I still do agree the theatrical version flows better in that regard, but I had to compromise a little bit.

As for the two "father-figures" argument I have to respectfully disagree with that. First, with the addition of the alternate Uncle Ben death scene it should be clear that the phone call was done immediately before his death, when Peter was still experiencing inner turmoil. He also says later he needs to figure out how to use his gifts, which he already has--as Spider-Man. Of course, filmmaking wise what you say makes sense--he still has unresolved issues and Peter chooses to accept them for who he is--but just because he learned the truth doesn't mean his father's absence no longer haunts him. As he says in the next movie to Harry, "We both got dumped." And neither does including both sequences negate each other--Peter's discovery of the video resolves the conflict regarding the absence his father, both from a plot and thematic perspective, while the phone call is for Peter to reconcile with everything he's been going through in this movie from a character perspective. I think it works.

I'll go more into detail about your thoughts on the TASM2 in your review for that edit, but I will say that I don't think including the plane crash plus deleted scene in the first film negatively affects the second one. It's not like I totally cut it. We see plenty of scenes in movie sequels or tv seasons where it thematically mirrors its predecessor. My edits are meant to be watched together, so that parallel is still there, just shifted.

With all that said, I knew my Untold version wouldn't be for everyone--that is the prime reason I released it separate from the regular Extended Edition. The choice is yours to watch whichever one you prefer.

S
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Overall rating
 
8.2
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9.0
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9.0
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8.0
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7.0
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7.0
I was intrigued by the approach of this edit, shifting a subplot from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 to the first film in the series (because god knows that film didn't need that many subplots). Unfortunately, I came away not feeling the experiment totally worked. For example, I felt the inclusion of the plane crash scene early in the film palpably hurt the pacing and took us out of Peter's perspective when we ought to have stayed rooted in the character and his journey. I ultimately didn't feel the scene told us that much that we couldn't glean from other sequences.

The other "untold story' scenes felt similarly superfluous, much as they did in the original 'Amazing Spider-Man 2' film. I do however feel that many of the reincorporated deleted scenes worked in the movies favor, giving more pathos to the character of Dr. Curt Conners. It's a shame that placeholder vfx and sfx in some scenes were still obvious, despite Masirimso putting in a good effort to patch up any obvious green screen. Ultimately I'd recommend Masirimso17's standard extended edition instead.
Owner's reply January 16, 2022

Thanks for the review, Octoroxx. You're right that in order to accomplish my goals with the story I had to compromise some of the editing choices in the film. I think overall it works more effectively than the regular one, but that is just a preference thing and I know not everyone will enjoy it--that is precisely why I released the Untold version separately than the regular one, so people can pick whichever version they prefer. I suspect you'll enjoy the regular one much more :)

I did try to remedy your first point by including the family taking a photo together, which I think works well.

Regardless, I'm glad you enjoyed my edit regardless.

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Overall rating
 
9.3
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10.0
Amazing! Pun intended; simply amazing! Adding the parent storyline from the 2nd movie flushed out this movie so much! So much that I didnt even realize that was the change you made. It fit so well; there are a few moments that I felt the "edit" in the transitions but it wasn't anything that took me out or ruined the viewing. I enjoyed this but do wish there was a way to get it closer to its original runtime.

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I can't say I really noticed which scenes were deleted or not, I suppose that's the dream to have edits be unnoticeable. That being said, I was able to recognize which scenes were used from ASM2.
When I initially watched The Amazing Spider-Man, I thought the stuff with the parents were dumb, I don't need to know about Peter's parents. But by the end, seeing that storyline presented in this fashion, I didn't mind it so much.
For what it's worth, I generally found myself enjoying this more than when I last watched the vanilla movie, though I can't definitively say whether that's because of the edit, or just because I've had more time to think about it. In any case, there's really no reason to not watch thus edit if you're going to watch the movie anyways, it's either on oar with or better than the original, and it's a bit more satisfying.

I don't know, I suck at reviews. Can't wait to watch your Amazing Spider-Man 2 Untold edit, I suspect that I'm going to absolutely love it.
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